School Performance Reports

To See 2015-16 School Performance Reports Choose School Below

White River High School
Glacier Middle School
Elk Ridge Elementary School
Foothills Elementary School
Mountain Meadow Elementary School
Wilkeson Elementary School


The district annually provides a report card to parents and the community on the progress of each school and the district as a whole toward meeting requirements for highly qualified staff, and student progress toward state and national goals. These School Performance Reports are available annually on our website at the end of October. Information about how to find them is located in the August edition of our district newsletter which is mailed out.  School Performance Reports are available in an alternate format for anyone who does not have internet.

OSPI School Report Cards (link)

Additional information about our district and individual schools can be found on the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction web site.  This includes information on Highly Qualified Teachers in White River. The federal definition of a highly qualified teacher is one who meets all of the following criteria:

  • Fully certified and/or licensed by the state
  • Holds at least a bachelor degree from a four-year institution
  • Demonstrates competence in each core academic subject area in which the teacher teaches

Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) is one of the cornerstones of the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) signed into law January 2002 as the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act. In the state of Washington, it is primarily a measure of year-to-year student achievement on the state assessment in reading and mathematics.  A preliminary list of schools and districts identified for improvement is released by August 31. The final list is released by November 15

NAEP Results (link)
Commonly called The Nation's Report Card, NAEP is the only test in the United States that allows comparisons of the performance of students in Washington with performance of students nationally. Assessments are conducted periodically in mathematics, reading, science, writing, the arts, civics, economics, geography, and U.S. history.


Teacher/Principal Evaluation Model (link)
An evaluation system that truly builds the capacity of our teachers will lead to better practice, which ultimately will result in greater learning for all students. 
-Stephen Fink, Executive Director of the University of Washington Center for Educational Leadership